Tainan Fine Arts Museum

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Location : Tainan, Taiwan
Dates : 2014 - Competition
Client : City of Tainan
Design team : Martin Duplantier Architectes
Mission : Design Conception
Built area : 50 M€
Cost : 25 000 sqm

In and Out: two museums within the city.

The notion of heritage, felt the world over, is treated here in a unique manner. Tainan, former capitol of Formosa must activate its own living heritage.

“Open Heritage”

The urban dimension of this project resides in its capacity to spill over its site and give birth to a neighborhood steeped in culture. La Yu Ai Street creates a link not only between the two museums, but also to the numerous temples and cultural institutions in the area. This space becomes the backbone of the ensemble, both of the existing and of the projected, thereby structuring the city center. The two museums revisit what architecture means to heritage each in their own manner.

The Museum of Modern Art is a variation of the Old Town.

The extension remains within a typology of segmented elements at the small scale where public and private functions intermingle. A public street crosses the museum, creating a small plaza at its core. The glass cubes contrast with the brick of the existing buildings, all the while reflecting a myriad of images of the local heritage. The Museum of Contemporary Art, given its centralized position at the heart of the city block, creates a wide esplanade connected to Yu Ai Street. A large canopy, both a protector and a distillation of a typical Chinese roofline shelters large exposition spaces. With the exception of the exhibit halls which are climate controlled, the rest of the ensemble is ventilated naturally. The shadow cast by the canopy drastically reduces the building’s energy consumption while creating a pleasing microclimate. Upon the roof, the panoramic view over the city crowns this passage through its urbanity.